coco

  • August 31st, 2015
    CHANEL FROM A TO Z : CAMBON

    CHANEL FROM A TO Z : CAMBON

    Rue Cambon is where it all began. Mademoiselle Chanel settled there in 1910 with the opening of her first shop at number 21, selling hats under the name “Chanel Modes”.

    In 1918, she opened her Haute Couture House at number 31. Its layout under Gabrielle Chanel’s direction has remained unchanged, with its mirrored staircase leading to the apartment, followed by the Design Studio, where even today the House’s collections are brought to life under Karl Lagerfeld.

  • August 18th, 2015
    CHANEL FROM A TO Z : BOY

    CHANEL FROM A TO Z : BOY

    The sportif-chic codes of Gabrielle Chanel’s wardrobe were inspired by the gentlemanly style of Arthur "Boy" Capel, her greatest love, and a keen polo player. As regards his support of the founding of her house, he would later say to Coco:
    “I thought I was giving you a toy, but I was giving you your freedom.”

  • August 1st, 2015
    CHANEL FROM A TO Z : AUGUST

    CHANEL FROM A TO Z : AUGUST

    Coco Chanel was born on 19 August 1883, under the sign of Leo.

  • May 2nd, 2015
    THE CRUISE COLLECTION

    THE CRUISE COLLECTION

    In 1919 a small mid-season collection proposed by Coco for her clients vacationing in sunny climes gets a mention in American Vogue. The acceleration of cultural and social change sees the emergence of a new, independent woman who drives, and practices sports, while travel on luxury liners becomes fashionable among high society. The sportswear category takes off, with Gabrielle a key influencer.

    In her boutique in Biarritz she proposes a sober, elegant wardrobe (think baggy, sailor-style pants, beach pajamas, and open-neck shirts) aimed at women familiar with the resort and yachting lifestyle of the era’s fashionable resorts, with as their playground the Basque Country, the Riviera and the Lido. Her designs, which coincide with the democratization of fashion and advances in travel that took off during the 1930s, are also cited in L’Officiel de la Mode in 1936: ’’A comprehensive mid-season collection… rich in suits and evening gowns.” The Cruise spirit is born, with Gabrielle its pioneer. Outmoded, the collection winds down in the 1950s but is resurrected by Karl Lagerfeld soon after his arrival at Chanel in 1983. Presented in late spring, on the fringes of the ready-to-wear collection, the silhouettes herald the arrival of summer.

    The collection’s success sees the introduction of an annual show in the year 2000, a concept that slowly filters through to the rest of the fashion industry. Chanel sportswear, having evolved into more elegant lines, today addresses a global clientele on the lookout for newness, with fresh pieces introduced by the Maison roughly every two months. Refined, light and colorful, these summery silhouettes - geared to the day, cocktail-hour or evening - are especially suited to the climates of countries in South America, the Middle East and South-East Asia.

    Blending together the traditions of a wardrobe and the modernity of a cosmopolitan style, the Cruise collection is about traveling. Each stop is for Karl Lagerfeld the occasion to tour favorite Gabrielle Chanel's destinations and to envision those she would have love to discover.

    Gabrielle Chanel and Roussy Sert on a boat - Circa 1935 © All Rights Reserved

  • April 24th, 2015
    TWO REBEL SPIRITS, <BR />FIGURES OF MODERNITY

    TWO REBEL SPIRITS,
    FIGURES OF MODERNITY

    “Prodigiously intelligent” is how Francis Poulenc describes Coco Chanel to Marie-Laure de Noailles in the early 1930s, before the two women meet at last, an attribute that also sums up the spirited Marie-Laure, though the traits they had in common did not end there.

    Fact and fiction shaped both of their childhoods. Gabrielle, for her part, masked the unhappiness of her early years and went on to invent a legend. Marie-Laure, who was raised in a highly cultivated, privileged environment that was lacking in affection, had a solitary childhood, as the descendant of a wealthy German banking family and a French aristocratic clan whose ancestry can be traced back to the notorious Marquis de Sade. Her eccentric grandmother, the Comtesse de Chevigné, who partly inspired Marcel Proust’s Madame de Guermantes, was to prove a major influence.

    Just like Gabrielle, Marie-Laure follows her artistic instincts. The Parisian hôtel particulier that she moves into following her marriage to Charles de Noailles already houses a major collection of Old Masters, from Delacroix to Rembrandt, Goya to Rubens. The couple commission decorator Jean-Michel Frank to redesign the site’s interiors — think stripped back spaces with monastic volumes, marrying rare pieces of furniture and unique materials like straw and panels of parchment with pure forms. This stark aesthetic echoes Marie-Laure’s own look, with her wardrobe of Chanel suits (she owned 40 different styles, most of them black, according to Abbé Mugnier).

    In constant pursuit of refinement, Chanel the designer favors the harmony of lines and the simplification of the garment, freeing up movement. Marrying beauty and function, she defines a new modernity.

    A rebel and nonconformist like Coco, Marie-Laure gets a kick out of provocation. In 1932, as one of the first to adopt the diamond jewelry designs audaciously presented by Gabrielle to help “combat the economic crisis”, she appears in Vogue sporting a sparkling feather brooch.

    Chanel revolutionizes fashion; Marie-Laure as muse and patron, and later painter and writer, contributes to the history of art, amassing, together with her husband, a collection of works spanning Braque, Picasso, Balthus, Mondrian, Giacometti and Man Ray. The couple play host to le tout-Paris and cultivate their knack for scouting new talent, notably the Surrealists. They finance cinematic projects, and lend support to composers like Markevitch, Poulenc and Stravinsky …

    More discreet in her support of the arts, it is Gabrielle Chanel who offers shelter to the Russian composer and his family in her villa in Garches. As early as 1924 she designs the costumes for Le Train Bleu, a ballet by Diaghilev featuring a decor painted by Picasso, along with other productions and a film by Renoir. She shares close relationships with the poets of the day and avant-garde artists including Dali, Nijinski and Visconti. Coco also shares a close friendship with Cocteau, for whom Marie-Laure has had an infatuation all her life … Marie-Laure is a hopeless romantic; Coco, who is destined to remain alone, despite her epic love affairs, confesses that, without love, a woman is nothing.

    Sophie Brauner

    Marie-Laure de Noailles © Henri Martinie / Roger-Viollet

    [more]
  • March 11th, 2015
    THE TWO-TONE SHOE

    THE TWO-TONE SHOE

    For this Fall-Winter 2015/16 Ready-to-Wear show, every model wore a beige shoe with a black toe, squared heel and revisited proportions: “It’s become the most modern of shoes and makes beautiful legs,” Karl Lagerfeld explained.

    Mademoiselle called them pumps. "They are the final touch of elegance" she used to say. To perfect the silhouette that Gabrielle Chanel introduced to the world, it was necessary to create a shoe that went with any outfit, one that was elegant, could be worn morning to night, and was suited to the new lifestyle of women.
    In 1957, Mademoiselle Chanel created the two-tone slingback shoe in beige and black. It created a highly graphic effect: the beige lengthened the leg while the black shortened the foot. Whereas shoes had previously been made in a single color that matched the color of one's clothing, Mademoiselle Chanel once again overturned the codes of fashion by pairing beige and black with all outfits. In her words, "You leave in the morning wearing beige and black, you have lunch in beige and black, and you attend a cocktail party wearing beige and black. You're dressed for the entire day!" Chanel's slingback shoe experienced instant success. It varied in style, offering versions with a straighter or thinner heel and a rounded, square or pointed toe. Mademoiselle Chanel improved its comfort with the help of Massaro (which has remained Chanel's custom shoe brand to this day) by adding an elastic strap. Located "just steps away from Rue Cambon," the Massaro workshop continues to create all of the footwear creations for Chanel's Haute Couture and Métiers d’Art collections. Starting with his very first collection, Karl Lagerfeld has channeled his talent to modernize this model. The two-tone shoe thus lends itself to a myriad of metamorphoses. In just one season, it may be transformed into a ballerina slipper, boot or sandal without losing any of its original spirit.

    © Photo Philippe Garnier / Elle-Scoop

  • March 10th, 2015
    THE BRASSERIE GABRIELLE

    THE BRASSERIE GABRIELLE

    Coco Chanel often attended the Parisian brasseries with her artist friends. Following theatrical performances, Gabrielle surrounded by Igor Stravinsky, dancer and choreographer Serge Lifar, or Salvador Dalí, would take her place in these enlightened restaurants where elegance, great minds and gastronomy created a harmonious blend. And, on nights when Boy Capel (her first love) did not accompany her to the Opera, she would spend the evening at Maxim's or at the Café de Paris.
    With the "Brasserie Gabrielle" fashion show, Karl Lagerfeld, artistic director of Chanel, has provided a reinterpretation of this Parisian passion.

    Boris Coridian

    Gabrielle Chanel and Serge Lifar, photo © Société des Bains de Mer - Monte Carlo

  • February 25th, 2015
    THE STORY OF THE ICONIC HANDBAG

    THE STORY OF THE ICONIC HANDBAG

    Initiator of a new, liberating and modern gesture, Gabrielle Chanel created a bag that she needed herself, an accessory which freed up the hands: the iconic bag of the House is born.
    Even today, the classic design still follows the first partitions dictated by Gabrielle: a chain interwoven with leather ribbon that allows to carry it on the shoulder, quilting inspired by the equestrian universe that Gabrielle Chanel loved so much, garnet leather that reminds one of the color of the uniform which Gabrielle had to wear at the Aubazine orphanage, and the regular twist clasp called the "Mademoiselle".
    Every season, Karl Lagerfeld metamorphoses the iconic bag: different materials, clasps transformed into jewels and chevron quilting enriches the legendary Chanel bag family. The iconic bag is part of an heritage that is transmitted from mother to daughter. As Chanel used to say: "Fashion becomes unfashionable, style never".

    Mademoiselle Chanel by Mike de Dulmen © CHANEL All rights reserved

  • January 26th, 2015
    CHANEL, <BR />HAUTE COUTURE HOUSE SINCE 1913

    CHANEL,
    HAUTE COUTURE HOUSE SINCE 1913

    Haute Couture was born during the Second Empire within the Rue de la Paix quarter in the heart of Paris. Englishman Charles-Frédéric Worth opened his house in 1858. He demonstrated his innovation by rejecting the statute of a fashion designer as a "supplier" and embracing that of the designer as a "creator," and by presenting veritable fashion collections worn by models to clients in his luxurious salons. At this time, Paris was filled with small trades devoted to embellishment (embroiderers, feather-workers, button-makers, shoemakers, glove makers, hatters, etc.) and enjoyed a reputation as the only world capital where elegance reigned.

    In 1945, very specific rules defined the statutes of Haute Couture. Updated throughout the years, they have survived time, making Haute Couture the absolute reference for a subtle blend of tradition and innovation. The specifications require that original models be designed by the permanent designer of the house. They must be created in its own workshops, which should have a minimum of 20 employees. Each season, on the dates set by the Chambre Syndicale de la Haute Couture, the house must present a collection of at least 35 looks consisting of both day and evening styles.

    As a bearer of unique expertise and maintenance of tradition, Haute Couture excels in the perfection of all the details that give it its singular, rare character. It is also a laboratory brimming with ideas and creativity, in which the quality and perfection of its cuts are crystallized in time.

    Chanel is currently the oldest operating couture house.

    © Photo All Rights Reserved, Chanel ateliers circa 1935

  • December 1st, 2014
    Par Françoise-Claire Prodhon
    CHANEL AND AUSTRIA <BR />BY FRANÇOISE-CLAIRE PRODHON

    CHANEL AND AUSTRIA
    BY FRANÇOISE-CLAIRE PRODHON

    Austria captivated Gabrielle Chanel with its charm, atmosphere and mountainous landscape. She loved nature, sport and outdoor activities as much as cultural events and high society: Austria offered it all. In a letter to Jean Cocteau on July 16, 1922 she wrote: "Tzara is in Tirol - seems to be feeling better and happy - perhaps I will go there too". Like many artists at that time, Tristan Tzara was there with Max Ernst and Paul Eluard, other members of the Dada movement.
    Since the mid-nineteenth century, Salzburg and the Austrian Tirol had become highly desirable destinations. This popularity was confirmed in 1920, when director Max Reinhardt, composer Richard Strauss and author Hugo von Hofmannsthal created the Salzburg Festival, an annual summer operatic festival attracting a cultured and elegant audience.

    In the early 1930s, Gabrielle Chanel loved to visit the famous ski station of Saint‑Moritz, and it was here that she met Baron Hubert von Pantz, a dashing Austrian aristocrat. Elegant and courtly, he had all the traits to charm Gabrielle Chanel, with whom he had a two-year affair. In these early years of the 1930s, he bought Schloss Mittersill, a castle he transformed into a prestigious luxury hotel.

    Schloss Mittersill was an instant success and in 1936, the American edition of Vogue magazine referred to it as: "the most talked-of place in Austria". With his high standards and exquisite manners, Hubert von Pantz attracted high ranking guests from the elite, including the Duc de Gramont and the Marquise de Polignac; but also artists such as Marlene Dietrich, Douglas Fairbanks and Cole Porter, all drawn in by the hotel's refined atmosphere as well as its traditional character. It offered many activities, ranging from golf to hikes on the glaciers, as well as shopping, an opportunity for this swanky clientèle to buy traditional Loden garments. It was at Mittersill that Gabrielle Chanel noticed the impeccable jackets worn by the hotel's elevator operators… A garment that she would remember in the early 1950s, when she created the iconic jacket of the Chanel suit, worn in 1961 by her friend, Austrian-born actress Romy Schneider...

    Françoise-Claire Prodhon

    The actress Romy Schneider during a fitting with Gabrielle Chanel in 1961
    Photo Giancarlo Botti ©BOTTI/STILLS/GAMMA

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